CROSS-LANGUAGE INFORMATION PROCESSING WORKSHOP 2007
Beyond document processing: from computational linguistics to computational humour

Third international CLIP workshop – July 10, 2007 - Camogli (Genova), Italy

UPDATES: Instructions for the presentation file on the submission page - Technical program on the WILF2007 website.

Workshop presentation

Description

The CLIP workshop focuses on computational linguistics in cross-language contexts. The 2007 edition will also be devoted to making sense out of texts processing their semantics, sentiments, emotions and humour taking into account the affective weight of lexicon.

Language technologies have steadily evolved in recent years. However the issue of language diversity has not been addressed to a similar extent as other aspects. Indeed, many socio-economical environments, of which the European Union is a prominent example, are inherently based on cultural diversity. Therefore solving multilingual issues is central to the development of the Information Society in the EU. On the other hand, this is true in many other instances (we may recall the case of India with more than 20 official languages and several more idioms actually spoken). This means that this topic is of strong European interest, but has a global relevance.

The final aim of the event is to bring together researchers with different backgrounds to encourage a cross-disciplinary discussion in the computational linguistics field making emphasis also on recent computational trends such as sentiment analysis and automatic humour recognition, the topic of the invited talk.

Topics

Submissions are welcome in areas of computational linguistics with an emphasis on the multilingual aspect as well as on new trends such as computational humour, sentiments and semantics

  • Ontologies in linguistics
  • Text classification and clustering
  • Text mining
  • Text summarisation
  • Question answering
  • Word sense disambiguation
  • Sentiment analysis
  • Computational humour

The official language of the workshop is English.